Observations of a London Met learning technologist at Digifest 2019.

I recently dipped into Digifest 2019, an annual edtech event for staff in higher education held over two days every year in March. This year we were in Birmingham and the focus was shaping education for a hyper-connected world.

 

Keynote slide listing the top ten skills most likely to be in greater demand up to 2030.

One of the keynote speech slides which lists the top ten skills most likely to be in greater demand up to 2030.

The opening keynote speech was delivered by Joysy John director of education, Nesta. (Nesta being an international innovation foundation). She attempted to answer the question ‘How, in a rapidly changing world, do we create an education system that prepares all learners to thrive in the future world of work?’ She based her answer on Nesta’s research concerning the future of skills which shows that skills like creativity, communication, problem-solving and resilience will be more important than ever.

Making more effective use of technology and data can help make education more convenient, accessible and effective. Businesses, academia and government will need to work in partnership to ensure that the education system is fit for the future.

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Discover your digital capabilities!

The Digital Discovery Tool

The digital discovery tool is an online resource developed by Jisc, the body responsible for the Joint Academic Network. The tool enables you to explore the different elements we call ‘digital capabilities’ and find out more about your own digital practice.

digital capabilities framework

The digital capabilities framework

Through a series of reflective questions, the digital discovery tool gives you an opportunity to reflect on your own confidence and ability in each element of the Jisc Digital Capability Framework (see diagram). There are three kinds of question relating to each element:

  1. Confidence questions – you rate your confidence with a digital practice or skill
  2. Depth questions – you select the one statement  that best describes your approach to a digital task.
  3. Breadth questions – you select all the digital activities that you engage in.
Once you’ve signed up, you will find the discovery tool on your dashboard. If you’ve created an academic profile, you will also have an additional reflective survey about specialisms relevant to your role.
Your personal report
A rose diagram being a summary of your digital capabilities

A rose diagram summarizing your digital capabilities. Each wedge is a percentage score for that element.

When you have answered all questions, you will receive a personal report. For each element of the framework, you will see:
  • A visual summary of your overall capabilities (see diagram)
  • A capability level. corresponding to one of three available levels: developing, capable or proficient.
  • Advice about ‘next steps’ to consider if you want to develop further
  • Links to relevant resources to help improve, consolidate, or gain recognition for your skills in this area.

You can download a copy of your report to review in your own time – we hope it will encourage and inspire you! You might want to share your report with others, for example during appraisals and as part of your professional development process. This is your choice.

Your individual test data is private, and will not be made available to anyone else. Jisc provides London Met with anonymised information about the number of people who have used the discovery tool, and their aggregate capability levels.

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